Wednesday, 10 October 2018

Patagonia to Hustisford

If you are looking for that special winter getaway, Chile might be just the ticket. The Route of Parks trail spans across 1,740 miles from Puerto Montt all the way to Cape Horn.

Sparked by the recent donation of 408,000 hectares of private conservation land by Tompkins Conservation, the Chilean government announced that it will convert 2 million hectares of conservation reserve land into national park land. Combined with the Tomkins donation and existing national park property, the new Patagonian Route of Parks trail stitches together a network of national parks that occupy around 11.5 million hectares.

Douglas and Kristine Tompkins made their fortune in outdoor apparel, founding both North Face and Esprit. They created Tomkins Conservation and began buying up land for conservation in the 1990s. Tomkins Conservation made the donation last year, following the accidental death of Douglas Tomkins kayaking the Patagonia in 2015. 

While I do not usually post about outdoor recreation, this story is different. The Patagonian Route of Parks not only created a trail for hikers and backpackers, but a vital corridor for wildlife.

Meanwhile back in Wisconsin

Fragmentation is second only to habitat loss as threats to rare plants and animals. In Wisconsin, this plays out as small prairie remnants nestled along old town road right-of-ways, railroad corridors and the forgotten corners of early graveyards. Minute micro habitats where a tiny number of native plants, as well as the insects and animals that depend on them, hang onto a tenuous existence.

An increasing number of private landowners are deciding to manage part of all of their land for conservation. Small restored prairies are showing up in areas where once they dominated the landscape. Woodland owners are investing great effort to thin over-mature woodlands and clear invasive shrubs that a generation ago chocked out grasses and wildflowers.

 

Staying connected

While the work and money these landowners are plowing back into their land is vital to conserve and protect Wisconsin, those efforts cannot by themselves same many of the species that are heading for a quite death. These islands of habitat need to be connected.

Take for example the whirled milkweed. This tiny member of the milkweeds, grows barely a foot tall. It spreads through rhizomes into patches thirty feet or more across. However, whirled milkweed does not self-pollinate. That means that pollen from stems in the same clone must be transported to flowers on a different clone in order to pollinate those flowers and produce seed.

As farms and the equipment got bigger, fences were removed. Less productive land was also worked up for cultivation. This reduced that places where the Whirled milkweed could grow.It also isolated the few remaining populations that had been hanging on. These plants can live for thirty years of more. However, without cross pollination, the few remaining plants will eventually die without producing seed for new generations.

The solution to the problem is obvious, we need to connect fragmented islands of habitat. These do not need government to set aside vast expanses of public land to make that happen. As private landowners, we can work together to protect our natural heritage. Working together, neighbor to neighbor, we can make a difference.

Maintaining our outdoor traditions means ensuring we have a strong habitat where wildlife can survive long-term. This is called resilience, which comes from keeping as many pieces of the puzzle as we can.

Better together

So what can you do? None of us are billionaires who can purchase hundreds of thousands of acres. We can, however, walk next door and talk to with the folks who live around us. That marsh stretching a half mile south across the next two properties is more valuable for waterfowl if you work with your neighbors.

Together, we cans share equipment, labor and knowledge to increase the impact our conservation work has. This is especially important when taking on tough invasive species like buckthorn, garlic mustard or phragmites. Increasing waterfowl production will  be much easier if you can get those two neighbors upstream to work with you.

Restoring and maintaining the natural heritage of our state is too big for individual landowners to fix. Government cannot maintain the land it owns, so they can only be very limited partners. Neighbor-to-neighbor, is the only way we get back the quail and ruffed grouse. Working with neighbors is the only way to ensure our woodland remain clear of buckthorn and garlic mustard. A shared vision is the best way to return waterfowl production to that marsh seemingly lost to cattail and phragmites.

It takes time to make these things happen, but there is no time like right now to go for a walk with your neighbor.

August 2018

Monday, 13 August 2018

Oak Landowners’ Workshop

Large open growth form oak tree

Oak trees are the iconic tree of the driftless region of Wisconsin.

Save the date Saturday, September 29, 2018 for the Oak in the Driftless Landowner workshop in Baraboo, Wisconsin. The session runs from 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM CDT. While targeted to landowners in the driftless area, landowners across southern Wisconsin will benefit. If you own land with oak trees or live south of the tension zone and want to re-introduce oaks to your property, this session will help get you on your way.

Conservation Digest is proud to support organizations like the Aldo Leopold Foundation and My Wisconsin Woods.

Location

University of Wisconsin-Baraboo/Sauk County
1006 Connie Rd
Umfoefer Building
Baraboo, WI 53913

Schedule

Morning sessions include:

* Oak ecology
* Improving wildlife habitat
* Properly harvesting trees
* Tree planting
* Identifying and controlling invasive species
* Using prescribed fire
* Managing for deer and turkey
* Understanding what your trees are worth
* Programs and resources available to woodland owners
* Developing a plan for your woods

Lunch

Afternoon field trip options include visiting woodlands that focus on:

* Invasive species control
* Tree planting
* Shelterwood harvest – a two-step method of tree harvesting that encourages oak to grow.
* Patch-cutting – a method where landowners can create small openings in their woodlands to encourage oaks to grow.

Other topics covered during the field trips include wildlife habitat improvements, using financial programs, prescribed fire, and how to implement a management plan.

Registration

Early Bird Registration Fee: $25 (Individual) or $40 (Couple) ends August 26th.

Registration Fee after August 26th: $35 (Individual) or $50 (Couple) ends September 17th.

Click here if you plan to attend.

Door prizes are being donated by McFarlanes’ Retail and Service Center in Sauk City.

Sponsors

Workshop sponsors include: The Aldo Leopold Foundation, McFarlanes’ Retail and Service Center, My Wisconsin Woods, National Wild Turkey Federation, The Nature Conservancy, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service and UW-Extension.

January 2018

Tuesday, 30 January 2018

Landowners Get Help from CSP

CSP poster encourage landowners to participate.

You probably know about the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and may already be participating. But there are more things you can do around the farm or ranch to improve your bottom line while helping the land. The Conservation Stewardship Program provides help for forest landowners, ranchers and farmers. Your application must be received by March 2, 2018 to be considered this year for this funding but year. Applications received later will be considered for the 2019 growing season.

Apply for the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) to improve your operation and land health. USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) uses CSP to help private landowners build their business while using conservation practices that improve sustainability. NRCS plans to enroll up to 10 million acres in CSP in 2018.

How Does This Work?

CSP lets you earn payments for actively managing, maintaining, and expanding conservation activities, including: cover crops, ecologically-based pest management, buffer strips and pollinator habitat. These go hand in hand with maintaining active agriculture production on your land. CSP also helps you adopt new technologies and management practices such as precision agriculture applications, on-site carbon storage & planting for high carbon sequestration rate, and new soil amendments to improve water quality.

Some of the benefits of CSP include: improved cattle gains per acre; increased crop yields; lower input costs; more and wider variety of wildlife. CSP activities can also improve drought resistance and storm water management.

The CSP website has a CSP Enhancements tool that lets you select your land use and conservation concern. Then it displays a list of recommended enhancement practices. There is a downloadable pdf file for each enhancement.

Contact your local USDA service center or visit www.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted for more information.

We’re Just Getting Started

CSP and CRP are by no means the only games in town. There are more programs that can help with both money and technical assistance.  The programs you choose will depend on your management goals; as well as current and planned land uses. Here is a listing of landowners programs, run by both governments and non-profit groups. You might just find the help you need for your next conservation project.

2017

December 2017

Wednesday, 27 December 2017

Landowner Help for Common Reed Control

Picture of standing man with common reed towering over him.

Photo by James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Landowners across southeastern Wisconsin know about common reed, an invasive grass that is even tougher than cattails. If this invasive species is on your hit list we have good news for you.

Description

Common reed (Phragmites australis), also called phragmites, invades moist habitats including lake shores, river banks and roadways. It has extensive rhizomes that can quickly spread underground and take over large areas. These rhizomes store energy, as a result, the plant can recover from cutting, burning or grazing. 

Common reed alters hydrology and wildlife habitat, increases fire potential, and shades native species. It can spread through root fragmentation, long runners above ground, and sometimes windblown seeds or cut stem fragments. Phragmites is on the Wisconsin DNR Chapter 40 list of prohibited and restricted species.

According to the Wisconsin Wetlands Association, Phragmites is the tallest wetland grass in Wisconsin. It grows upwards of 14 feet. Seed heads are visible from August to September, and it has a round stem, long, wide leaves. Its prominent plume-like seed head that is whitish to purplish in color. Be aware, there is a variety of Phragmites native to Wisconsin that forms less dense patches (you can generally see through the stand) and flowers earlier (July to August).

The Midwest Invasive Plant Network (MIPN) is working in partnership with the U.S. Forest Service Region 9, to host a series of 3 webinars in January and February featuring case studies of the restoration of sites invaded with exotic pest plants.

Webinar

Illustration of common reed seed head.

The first event will be on Tuesday, January 16th, 11:30 – 12:30 CST. The presentation is titled “Bridging the Gap – New Insights on Technology and on-the-ground Management of Phragmites.” The presentation will be given by Steve Apfelbaum, Founder and Chairman of Applied Ecological Services out of Brodhead, Wisconsin.

For free registration, please visit the MIPN site, and make sure the email address mipn@mortonarb.org is in your approved contacts to receive the webinar link.

November 2017

Friday, 03 November 2017

Fill’er Up!

Fall means it’s time to head into the woodlot to make wood for the furnace or fireplace. The cooler temperatures and fallen leaves also make brush cutting much easier.

Most landowners own several pieces of two-cycle equipment. Usually that list includes a chainsaw, though it may also include leaf blower, brush saw and even an old outboard motor or dirt bike. One thing is for sure; they all need fuel to run.

Two-cycle engines are popular because their power to weight ratio is so much better than four-cycle engines. That means a two-cycle engine will be a whole lot lighter its four-cycle cousin. As we all know, the trade-off is that they need to burn a mix of gas and two-cycle oil. Try using straight gas and watch you power equipment destroy itself as the pistons become welded to the cylinder walls.

What you may not know, however, is that most two-cycle engines are not designed to burn gasoline that contains ethanol, which eats away various gaskets and seals. 

While running a tank of ethanol containing gas may not immediately damage you equipment, many of us leave gas in the tank for days, weeks or months. To tell the truth, that half tank might sit unused in you brush saw or chainsaw for several years. Over that kind of time, even a single load of ethanol containing fuel cause significant damage.

Many stations only sell gas that contains ethanol. Others may sell ethanol-free gas but only in premium grades. It really makes sense to take the extra effort to find and use ethanol free gasoline in your power equipment.

Pure-gas.org is a website that lists gas stations that sell ethanol free gasoline. Their About page get into the nuts and bolts of ethanol free fuel. Whether a particular brand or grade contains ethanol can vary from one location to another, so you need to pay attention every time you stop at the pump.

Be safe and have fun in the woods.

October 2017

Tuesday, 03 October 2017

Forest Weed Grant Applications Due Soon

Are you a private landowner in the Mukwonago river watershed. who wants to remove invasive weeds and brush from your woodlands? The Friends of Mukwonago River has funds available now from a WDNR Forest Weed Management Grant. Application deadline to the Friends is October 23, 2017.

Landowners in the Mukwonago River Watershed have a unique opportunity to receive financial assistance as they learn control techniques for these and other invasive species and perform restoration on their own properties under a Forest Weed Grant through the Friends of the Mukwonago River. Invasive species are the current most critical threat to the health of the watershed.

Interested? The landowner application is here: 2016 FWG Land Owner Application & Rubric, and the FWG Land Management Template. Figure out where and what on your property you want to manage. You will need to submit and follow a management plan that is not difficult.

The WMA-PFGP assists eligible weed management groups (WMG) in addressing invasive plants, both by dealing directly with the invasives and by providing education, information and outreach to others. This is a reimbursement program that covers up to 75% of the eligible costs, 25% match is required.

Questions? Contact Friends at mukwonagoriver.org  Send your completed application to this email address, or our PO Box 21, Eagle WI. 53119   www.mukwonagoriver.org.

July 2017

Wednesday, 26 July 2017

Good Things Come in Small Packages

Wetlands educator show difference between Reed Canary Grass and native wetland grasses.

According to a new study released by University of Waterloo (Ontario, CA) professor Nandita Basu, small wetlands seem to be more efficient at reducing nutrient loading. His team reviewed 600 studies worldwide of wetlands rivers and reservoirs. They concluded that smaller wetlands are more effective as “nutrient sinks” because they have more soil that filters less water.

These findings are particularly important for Wisconsin because too much nitrogen and phosphorus cause the algae blooms that poison our lakes.

The way you manage runoff from your land affects the land and waters that are downhill. Small wetland restorations high in the watershed make a big difference. Restoration contractors and consultants can help you figure out the best practices to manage nutrient runoff.

Wetland restoration can be complicated. Moving soil and many other activities in wetlands require the right licenses and permits. Look for a professional who is trained in wetland ecology and has a proven track record doing wetland projects. Make sure to ask for and check out their references.

The Wisconsin Wetlands Association is a great first stop to find information about out wetlands. They not only have general information about wetlands, they provide really good resources for private landowners. The Wisconsin DNR has an online Wetland Restoration Handbook that has chapters to walk you through the entire restoration process.

Wisconsin’s wetlands are so much more than cattails. You will be amazed at how easy it is to fall in love with your swamp.

May 2017

Monday, 15 May 2017

Emerald Ash Borer: Landowner Workshop

Want to know how to tell whether your ash trees are being attacked by the Emerald Ash Borer? What do you do to protect your ash trees? What can be done with wood from ash trees that cannot be saved? All these questions and more will be answered at a special workshop, “Save your ash trees!” hosted by the Golden Sands Resource Conservation and Development Council.

The workshop will happen on Saturday June 3, 2017 from 9:30am to 3:30pm at the Mosquito Hill Nature Center, N3880 Rogers Rd, New London, WI. Registration is $15 and includes lunch. Seating is limited and the event will run rain or shine so dress for the weather!

Contact Amy Thorstenson (715) 343-6215 for more information or download and return their registration form.

March 2017

Friday, 03 March 2017

It’s Your Water; Your Well

Family using water around the home.

Groundwater is the world’s most extracted natural resource. Find out more about protecting the water the flows beneath your property during National Groundwater Awareness Week March 5-11, 2017. The National Groundwater Association (NGWA) has a set of private well owner tools. If you own a private well, you will want to check out these free resources from siting and  maintenance tips to water testing and financing options.

February 2017

Thursday, 16 February 2017

Help Attract More Bees

Southwest Badger Resource Conservation & Development Council is presenting a series of talks help landowners in Southwestern Wisconsin attract more bees, butterflies, humming birds and other pollinators to their property.

Pollinators and upland wildlife are vital to our economy, food sources and recreational opportunities and their decline is a serious problem. The lack of native prairie plants is contributing to a loss of both pollinators and upland bird species. The good news is it doesn’t matter if you own hundreds of acres or a small yard, you can help encourage pollinators like bees, butterflies and humming birds. This session will teach you about pollinator biology, the link between wildlife and healthy populations of pollinators, prairie establishment and choosing the best seed mix to fit your needs. Don’t miss out on this one of a kind opportunity to improve your land for future generations!

There will be four opportunities landowners to receive expert guidance on pollinator biology and establishing the plants necessary to their survival. The schedule of events is as follows: Friday February 24th from 6-8pm in La Crosse, Tuesday March 7th from 6:30-8:30pm in Baraboo, Wednesday March 8th from 6:00-8:00pm in Richland Center, and Thursday March 9th from 6:00-8:00pm in Prairie du Chien. A registration fee of $12 includes a pollinator information packet and prairie seed pack. To receive more information or reserve your spot contact Brandon Bleuer at Brandon.bleuer@swbadger.org or (309) 738-2607.

Crawford County Workshop Promotional Flyer 3-9-17
Richland County Pollinator Workshop Promotional Flyer 3-8-17
Sauk County Pollinator Workshop Promotional Flyer 3-7-17