Wednesday, 26 July 2017

Good Things Come in Small Packages

Wetlands educator show difference between Reed Canary Grass and native wetland grasses.

According to a new study released by University of Waterloo (Ontario, CA) professor Nandita Basu, small wetlands seem to be more efficient at reducing nutrient loading. His team reviewed 600 studies worldwide of wetlands rivers and reservoirs. They concluded that smaller wetlands are more effective as “nutrient sinks” because they have more soil that filters less water.

These findings are particularly important for Wisconsin because too much nitrogen and phosphorus cause the algae blooms that poison our lakes.

The way you manage runoff from your land affects the land and waters that are downhill. Small wetland restorations high in the watershed make a big difference. Restoration contractors and consultants can help you figure out the best practices to manage nutrient runoff.

Wetland restoration can be complicated. Moving soil and many other activities in wetlands require the right licenses and permits. Look for a professional who is trained in wetland ecology and has a proven track record doing wetland projects. Make sure to ask for and check out their references.

The Wisconsin Wetlands Association is a great first stop to find information about out wetlands. They not only have general information about wetlands, they provide really good resources for private landowners. The Wisconsin DNR has an online Wetland Restoration Handbook that has chapters to walk you through the entire restoration process.

Wisconsin’s wetlands are so much more than cattails. You will be amazed at how easy it is to fall in love with your swamp.

May 2017

Monday, 15 May 2017

Emerald Ash Borer: Landowner Workshop

Want to know how to tell whether your ash trees are being attacked by the Emerald Ash Borer? What do you do to protect your ash trees? What can be done with wood from ash trees that cannot be saved? All these questions and more will be answered at a special workshop, “Save your ash trees!” hosted by the Golden Sands Resource Conservation and Development Council.

The workshop will happen on Saturday June 3, 2017 from 9:30am to 3:30pm at the Mosquito Hill Nature Center, N3880 Rogers Rd, New London, WI. Registration is $15 and includes lunch. Seating is limited and the event will run rain or shine so dress for the weather!

Contact Amy Thorstenson (715) 343-6215 for more information or download and return their registration form.

March 2017

Friday, 03 March 2017

It’s Your Water; Your Well

Family using water around the home.

Groundwater is the world’s most extracted natural resource. Find out more about protecting the water the flows beneath your property during National Groundwater Awareness Week March 5-11, 2017. The National Groundwater Association (NGWA) has a set of private well owner tools. If you own a private well, you will want to check out these free resources from siting and  maintenance tips to water testing and financing options.

February 2017

Thursday, 16 February 2017

Help Attract More Bees

Southwest Badger Resource Conservation & Development Council is presenting a series of talks help landowners in Southwestern Wisconsin attract more bees, butterflies, humming birds and other pollinators to their property.

Pollinators and upland wildlife are vital to our economy, food sources and recreational opportunities and their decline is a serious problem. The lack of native prairie plants is contributing to a loss of both pollinators and upland bird species. The good news is it doesn’t matter if you own hundreds of acres or a small yard, you can help encourage pollinators like bees, butterflies and humming birds. This session will teach you about pollinator biology, the link between wildlife and healthy populations of pollinators, prairie establishment and choosing the best seed mix to fit your needs. Don’t miss out on this one of a kind opportunity to improve your land for future generations!

There will be four opportunities landowners to receive expert guidance on pollinator biology and establishing the plants necessary to their survival. The schedule of events is as follows: Friday February 24th from 6-8pm in La Crosse, Tuesday March 7th from 6:30-8:30pm in Baraboo, Wednesday March 8th from 6:00-8:00pm in Richland Center, and Thursday March 9th from 6:00-8:00pm in Prairie du Chien. A registration fee of $12 includes a pollinator information packet and prairie seed pack. To receive more information or reserve your spot contact Brandon Bleuer at Brandon.bleuer@swbadger.org or (309) 738-2607.

Crawford County Workshop Promotional Flyer 3-9-17
Richland County Pollinator Workshop Promotional Flyer 3-8-17
Sauk County Pollinator Workshop Promotional Flyer 3-7-17

January 2017

Wednesday, 04 January 2017

Enter to Win a Free Landowner Conservation Report

Registration is now open for the 2017 Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Landowner Lottery! Enter between January 3 through January 31, 2017 to win. The previous lotteries were so successful that the Bureau of Natural Heritage Conservation is pleased to offer another free lottery this year for private landowners.

Normally, state law requires that such a report would typically cost around $300, but this report is free thanks to private donations to the WI Endangered Resources Fund

Through a Landowner Conservation Report, you can receive information about rare plants and animals found in your area and opportunities to manage for their habitat. In 2016, 100 lottery winners each received a free site visit and a customized report. With this individualized report, you will also get information on common invasive species and other resources to help you manage your land.

Didn’t win in last year? Register again in 2017 with better odds to win!

More information is available on the lottery website or by contacting me at Alex.Wenthe@wisconsin.gov or (608)-267-7758.